slander

slander
I. slander slan‧der 1 [ˈslɑːndə ǁ ˈslændər] noun [countable, uncountable] LAW
a spoken statement about someone that is not true and is intended to damage the good opinion that people have of him or her, or the legal offence of making a statement of this kind:

• The company is being sued for slander by four pharmacists who say the retailer publicly ruined their reputations.

  [m0] II. slander slander 2 verb [transitive] LAW
to say untrue things about someone in order to damage other people's good opinion of them:

• Smith slandered him by accusing him of proposing an illegal business deal.

* * *

Ⅰ.
slander UK US /ˈslɑːndər/ noun [U] LAW
statements that someone makes about another person that are not true and that harm their reputation, or the crime of making these statements: »

Where is the line between slander and free speech?

»

The group is suing Van der Wald for slander.

»

a slander lawsuit/suit/charge

Compare LIBEL(Cf. ↑libel) noun
Ⅱ.
slander UK US /ˈslɑːndər/ verb [T] LAW
to say something about someone that is considered to be slander: »

She was accused of slandering the US beef industry on her television show.

Compare LIBEL(Cf. ↑libel) verb

Financial and business terms. 2012.

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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • slander — slan·der 1 / slan dər/ vt: to utter slander against slan·der·er n slander 2 n [Anglo French esclandre, from Old French escandle esclandre scandal, from Late Latin scandalum moral stumbling block, disgrace, from Greek skandalon, literally, snare,… …   Law dictionary

  • Slander — • The attributing to another of a fault of which one knows him to be innocent Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Slander     Slander      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Slander — Slan der, n. [OE. sclandere, OF. esclandre, esclandle, escandre, F. esclandre, fr. L. scandalum, Gr. ??? a snare, stumbling block, offense, scandal; probably originally, the spring of a trap, and akin to Skr. skand to spring, leap. See {Scan},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slander — Slan der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slandered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slandering}.] 1. To defame; to injure by maliciously uttering a false report; to tarnish or impair the reputation of by false tales maliciously told or propagated; to calumniate. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slander — n calumny, *detraction, backbiting, scandal Analogous words: defamation, vilification, aspersion, traducing (see corresponding verbs at MALIGN): *abuse, vituperation, invective, obloquy, scurrility slander vb defame, libel, calumniate, *malign,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • slander — [n] scandalous remark aspersion, backbiting*, backstabbing*, belittlement, black eye*, calumny, defamation, depreciation, detraction, dirt*, dirty linen*, disparagement, hit*, libel, lie, misrepresentation, muckraking, mud*, mud slinging*,… …   New thesaurus

  • slander — [slan′dər] n. [ME sclaunder < Anglo Fr esclaundre (OFr esclandre, escandle) < LL(Ec) scandalum: see SCANDAL] 1. the utterance in the presence of another person of a false statement or statements, damaging to a third person s character or… …   English World dictionary

  • slander — ► NOUN Law 1) the action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person s reputation. Compare with LIBEL(Cf. ↑libelous). 2) a false and malicious spoken statement. ► VERB ▪ make such statements about. DERIVATIVES slanderer …   English terms dictionary

  • SLANDER — The only instance of defamation in biblical law for which a penalty is prescribed is that of the virgin (Deut. 22:19) – and that defamation is in the nature of a matrimonial stratagem (cf. Deut. 22:16–17) rather than of a specifically defamatory… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • slander — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ gross (BrE), malicious, vicious, vile VERB + SLANDER ▪ be guilty of ▪ sue sb for …   Collocations dictionary

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